Schedule

8:00am to 8:50am

Room: 400
Session Format:
Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University

9:00am to 9:50am

Room: 174
Session Format: Presentation

Historically, introductory STEM courses are “gateways” that sometimes deter students from entering STEM fields. Nine instructors across eight different gateway courses in four STEM areas at Georgia Gwinnett College have implemented Specifications Grading assessment plans where students control their grades through mastery of course objectives. The nine instructors share their motivations for choosing and implementing Specifications Grading and their expectations of themselves and of their students within the new methodology. We present the lessons learned along the way and how membership in this interdisciplinary faculty learning community is impacting each instructor’s beliefs.

Speaker(s):
Georgia Gwinnett College
Georgia Gwinnett College
Georgia Gwinnett College
Georgia Gwinnett College
Georgia Gwinnett College
Room: 460
Session Format: Presentation

According to a recent Wall Street Journal article (Belkin, 2017) colleges are failing to improve students’ critical thinking skills and the lack of these skills is the biggest complaint employers have about recent college graduates.  This presentation will provide several examples of how current events were used in two business school classes to improve critical thinking skills as well as increase student engagement.  During the session, we will discuss ideas for using similar methods in other disciplines as well as identify what constitutes critical thinking skills.

Speaker(s):
Georgia Gwinnett College
Room: 462
Session Format: Presentation

Transference between theoretical concepts and application is a significant goal for instructors in all disciplines. In this session, I will discuss how I used backward design and WHERE (Where/Why, Hook, Explore/Experience, Revise/Refine, Evaluate) sequencing (Wiggins & McTighe, 1998) in my studio art courses to help students transfer traditional analogue techniques and processes to digital processes such as 3D printing and software programs. I will provide opportunities for instructors in other disciplines to evaluate ways they can be apply these principles in their courses.

Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University

10:00am to 10:50am

Room: 182
Session Format: Presentation

With distractions commonplace in the modern college classroom, this research assesses differences in student participation rates in distracting behaviors. The results from a study of undergraduate students that surveyed their participation in various distracting classroom behaviors will be presented.The study expands the current literature by assessing the degree to which a student’s gender influences the likelihood they will engage in a spectrum of classroom behaviors considered to be distracting. The interactive discussion will also include implications for faculty members.

Speaker(s):
Georgia Gwinnett College
Georgia Gwinnett College
Georgia Gwinnett College
Georgia Gwinnett College
Room: 460
Session Format: Presentation

Open Education Resources (OERs) are free education materials that can be used in classrooms by instructors and students. There are cost-specific benefits to using these resources in the classroom, since they eliminate high textbook costs. Workshop attendees will learn the various steps needed to successfully design and implement an OER course. These steps include writing learning objectives, creating formative and summative assessments, and aligning assessments with the learning objectives. The interactive workshop will model active learning strategies to encourage in-class discussion, student self-reflection, and the practice of writing learning objectives and assessment questions.

Speaker(s):
Georgia Institute of Technology
Georgia Tech
Room: 462
Session Format: Presentation

There is evidence within various disciplines that students can learn from each other and that peer-study is useful in promoting student success.  We have been conducting a study to probe the impact of compulsory group participation on student performance and attitudes in general chemistry.  In this session, we will discuss the structure of the study groups we have utilized and share the results obtained over the past year.  We will outline benefits and difficulties of using group assignments and consider how peer-focused learning can be incorporated to emphasize cross-discipline connections.  The participants will be asked to take part in a group activity and contribute feedback regarding student group assignments.

Speaker(s):
Georgia State University Perimeter College
Perimeter College Georgia State University
Room: 464
Session Format: Presentation

In college and universities, what happens during our class meetings (face-to-face or on-line) are major educational activities for our students; hence, creating a positive and inclusive environment in our courses is vital for learning and living in a diverse society.  As professors, no matter what subject we teach, we can broaden our approach so that all of our diverse students are included in a positive way.  Additionally, we can be conscientious of ways to ease culture tensions that might arise and have ways to support minority students’ educational process.  This interactive session will explore several methods we can implement.

Speaker(s):
California State University, Chico

11:00am to 12:00pm

Room: 400
Session Format: Presentation

Colleges and universities generally require that you submit letter grades to represent student performance, but how you determine those grades is up to you. Unfortunately, the way we have been grading student work for many decades earns low marks on a list of 14 criteria for assessing grading systems. This keynote presents an alternative system, specifications ("specs") grading, that does better, especially in motivating students to achieve outcomes and produce high-quality work.  Better yet, it saves you time. The system works effectively because it gives students more choices and control while holding their work to high academic standards. The purest form of this new system offers a new gestalt on assessment, combining three elements: satisfactory/unsatisfactory grading of all assignments and tests, a token system that lets students "buy" flexibility, and "bundles" of assessments associated with sets of learning outcomes and final letter grades. By the end of this keynote, you will be able adapt one or more of your courses to a pure or synthetic version of specs grading and revise your syllabus accordingly.

Speaker(s):
Clemson University

12:00pm to 1:00pm

Room: 400
Session Format:
Speaker(s):

1:00pm to 1:50pm

Room: 174
Session Format: Presentation

This workshop applies concepts from Brookfield's (2017) book, Becoming a Critically Reflective Teacher. The proposed session will begin with an overview of the workshop, followed by the administration of the Critical Incident Questionnaire (CIQ) and discussion of the four lenses of critical reflection - students' eyes, colleagues' perceptions, theory, and personal experience. The attendees will then be guided through a reflection exercise by facilitators using one of the aforementioned lenses. The session will conclude with a debriefing of the small group discussions and closing comments by the organizers on how these concepts can enhance teaching and learning.

Speaker(s):
Georgia Gwinnett College
Georgia Gwinnett College
Georgia Gwinnett College
Georgia Gwinnett College
Georgia Gwinnett College
Room: 182
Session Format: Presentation

Many questions exist regarding how to improve retention, progression, and graduation (RPG) (Noel, Levitz, & Saluri, 1985, p. 17). At the same time, it is recognized by many (Kennesaw State University, Complete College Georgia, 2016) that reducing DFW rates reduces college exit by students experiencing academic challenges and low grades. This presentation will show how a collaboration between faculty and students to apply one type of student support initiative has made a significant impact on undergraduate success across several disciplines. Narrative and data will clearly present the results while the presenters explain how the collaboration enhanced delivery and increased market penetration.

Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Kennesaw State University
Kennesaw State University
Room: 460
Session Format: Presentation

Gathering student input through a survey method to gauge interest is sometimes actively needed to help confirm that a newly proposed course would be viable in a given program and situation on campus. In such cases, how should a faculty member effectively gather such input when students have very little frame of reference for the course or its contents? After addressing practical tips that I have used for promoting (and explaining) a potential new course and also a new program in my area, attendees will apply those tools to a scenario for promoting a new course/program of their own to enhance an existing program or major at their respective institution.

Speaker(s):
Atlanta Metropolitan State College
Room: 462
Session Format: Presentation

In this session, attendees will learn how to implement the use of Google Classrooms and digital notebooks. Research shows that going digital enhances student engagement and performance. Digital notebooks help students to personalize and individualize learning along with increasing collaboration with teachers and peers. Students may express their thinking through videos, apps, text, and pictures. Digital notebooks enables teachers to create learning templates to drive instruction and students are able to layer information on top of each other. In addition, students are able to hyperlink to third party apps. After the session, attendees will have all the tools they need to implement digital notebooks with confidence and ease.

Speaker(s):
Fayetteville State University
Campbell University
Room: 464
Session Format: Presentation

This Presentation will give an overview of POGIL (Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning) and Specifications Grading.  Their goals are to reduce the DWF rate, improve student learning outcomes and increase rigor.  Attendees will be introduced to POGIL with a hands-on activity and learn the importance of matching learning outcomes to specific assessments.

Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University

2:00pm to 2:50pm

Room: 174
Session Format: Presentation

Institutions of higher education (IHE) have incorporated high-impact practices in liberal arts curricula so that students can systematically analyze the conditions that lead to racial and economic disparities in the community. High impact practices assist students achieve these learning goals through a broad range of courses and strategies from service-learning and first-year experiences to diversity learning and experiential learning (i.e., internships) (Kuh & O'Donnell, 2013). This study compares student learning outcomes for 1,500 students enrolled in general education courses that utilize service-learning, diversity learning, and experiential learning as primary pedagogical methods. Strategies that contributed to problem-solving, cultural competence, leadership skills, and civic responsibility outcomes in undergraduates are discussed.

Speaker(s):
Widener Unviersity
Room: 182
Session Format: Presentation

The purpose of our study is to develop a social support network and study skills curriculum that will encourage Black males to select STEM majors and careers.  In addition, we want to identify processes and resources to support their retention and persistence.   The research team developed a focus group questionnaire based on the literature centering on the factors affecting Black male’s success in STEM fields.  Two Black student researchers conducted three focus groups attended by 41 Black male KSU students.  Several themes emerged from these data providing valuable insight for teachers interested in increasing Black male academic success.

Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: 460
Session Format: Presentation

As the baby boomers near their mid-60s, many are rethinking leaving their chosen career in teaching for retirement. Furthermore if all of those who are eligible to retire do follow through, the teaching profession will be impacted severely. This presentation will focus upon how seasoned and experienced professionals can be reinvigorated so that learners can experience their mature wisdom and mindfulness. Discussions will include basic approaches that can enable advanced career professionals to embrace the concept of mindfulness and to function at their most effective level. The value of experience and wisdom cannot be underestimated or overlooked.

Speaker(s):
University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Room: 462
Session Format: Presentation

This presentation will introduce the audience to Results Based Accountability (RBA), an action oriented performance management research tool that helps people develop a "disciplined way of thinking and taking action." This presentation will teach participates how to use Results Based Accountability and develop powerful strategies that can be used to bring about change in the classroom, with children and families and within the larger community.  Lastly, the presenters will use interactive activities such as ”turn the curve" thinking to demonstrate how RBA can help identify "the story behind the data" and strategize ways to improve conditions in the participants specific areas of interest.

Speaker(s):
Bethune Cookman University
Room: 464
Session Format: Presentation

The presenters will focus on the incorporation of semi-structured written reflections into undergraduate coursework to improve students' understanding and retention of important information and their ability to draw important connections to prior learning.

Speaker(s):
Honors College, Kennesaw State University

3:00pm to 3:50pm

Room: 174
Session Format: Presentation

Professionals from a variety of fields learn through written and video-based cases, role play, rehearsal, and various forms of simulated learning environments. While the case method has many forms, each has particular affordances and limitations. Professional educators often choose which method to use based on practical considerations, but should there be greater concern for pedagogical fit? In this session, we will consider various frequently-used forms of the case method and explore which approaches best meet particular learning outcomes. Together, we will also consider what case-based options exist in our professional fields and look for how these might successfully transfer.

Speaker(s):
Vanderbilt University's Peabody College
Room: 182
Session Format: Presentation

Students in an Organic Chemistry I course were introduced to game-based learning. Game-based learning incorporates all types of learning styles as well as factual, conceptual, procedural, and meta-cognitive knowledge. The games designed and played in CHEM 2400 are adaptations of favorite board games or TV game shows. Each game addresses course and student learning objectives, allows students to spend more time on task with difficult concepts/topics, and provides a continual review of the subject matter. Assessment findings show the use of gaming as an enjoyable, alternative, and effective teaching tool for learning Organic Chemistry and mastering areas of difficulty.

Speaker(s):
Georgia State University - Perimeter College
Room: 460
Session Format: Presentation

Student demonstration of historical empathy involves 1) identifying the historical context of sources, 2) examining documents for the perspectives of historical figures, and 3) making affective connections to content. Using documents from the instructional unit "The Elizabeth Jennings Project," which is about antebellum civil rights activist Elizabeth Jennings, this session focuses on strategies that can promote historical empathy as a high impact practice in undergraduate history, humanities, and social science courses.

Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: 462
Session Format: Presentation

Often the only instructional feedback faculty receive occurs at the end of the semester and focuses less on effective teaching and student learning and more on course logistics or instructor behavior. We ran 85 GIFT (Group Instructional Feedback Technique) sessions with 3116 students in order to provide mid-semester feedback. GIFT sessions focus student learning via class discussions without the instructor present. Instructors receive a written report synthesizing the student responses. We will review the GIFT results, compare these to end-of-semester evaluations, and simulate a GIFT session in order to explore how to provide useful instructional feedback focused on student learning.

Speaker(s):
Georgia State University
Room: 464
Session Format: Presentation

Research typically indicates that allowing students to correct tests in any subject is beneficial for the students as well as the teacher.  Students have an opportunity to reach higher levels of mastery, while teachers are able to provide more effective feedback; or at least those are the perceived notions!  The benefits of test corrections must outweigh the time energy for both the students and the teacher in the team effort to achieve higher levels of mastery learning.  This presentation focuses on the different types of test corrections across disciplines, ways to mitigate time despair for the teacher and lessons learned.

Speaker(s):
Georgia Gwinnett College
Georgia Gwinnett College

3:55pm to 5:30pm

Room: Atrium
Session Format:
Speaker(s):

4:00pm to 5:30pm

Room: Atrium
Session Format: Poster

Self-directed learning (SDL) is a process of dealing with what to learn, to what depth and breadth, on learners’ control and responsibility. SDL can be employed to develop domain specific knowledge as well as helpful to transfer the conceptual skills to new learning situations. In recent years, the massive escalating proliferation of information and technology in human life can be seen in every field of world activities including forest science education, so the emergency is need fully felt to train new graduates for SDL. This study aims to measure the readiness for SDL among the second year forest science M.Sc. students. By employing the Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale (SDLRS), an instrument developed by Lucy M. Guglielmino during her PhD research, the readiness for SDL was measured among 120 (60+60) students at Hetauda Forestry Campus, affiliated with Forestry and Agriculture University (FAU), and Pokhara Forestry Campus affiliated with Tribhuvan University respectively.

Observed mean score was 235. The total score lower than 201, in between 202-226 and higher than 227 indicates below average, average and above average readiness for SDL. 75% students scored more than 201. So, most of the graduate students of forest science program are ready for self-directed learning. Also, the mean scores were not significantly different among the self-financing and the scholarship students as well as their sex. The second year graduate students of forest science program had a high degree of readiness for self-directed learning. It can be used to predict the students’ success in the entire forestry program. The similar studies can be done in other technical education programs to predict the program success rate of students at the beginning of the programs. The more study is required in technical programs to compare and contrast.

Key Words: Self-directed learning readiness scale (SDLRS), self-directed learning, adult learning, forest science program.

Speaker(s):
University of Tartu
Room: Atrium
Session Format: Poster

Like many institutions, Georgia State University utilizes Part-Time Instructors (PTIs) or adjunct faculty. In Fall 2016, Georgia State offered its first Part-Time Instructor Orientation, aimed at preparing PTIs to incorporate active learning techniques. We will discuss findings on the impact of our PTI orientation, especially in the areas of active learning and assessment. The presenter will provide examples and data from the orientation and conclude by working with attendees to help them develop their own active-learning PTI orientations and/or workshops and resources.

Speaker(s):
Georgia State University-Perimeter College
Room: Atrium
Session Format: Poster

Gwinnett Technical College (GTC) is a two-year open-access college, and is the second-largest technical college in Georgia. Instructors teaching Biology I play a major role in educating STEM and non-STEM majors in scientific literacy. To increase retention and success rates of Biology I students, three GTC biology faculty collaborated to redesign the course using a curriculum model best fitting the Backward Design method. There was a statistically significant increase in the number of students passing the course, and a decrease in DFW rates. Further analysis showed that first-year students, traditional-aged students, and minority students benefitted most from this redesign.

Speaker(s):
Gwinnett Technical College
Gwinnett Technical College
Georgia Gwinnett College
Room: Atrium
Session Format: Poster

First-year composition courses present multiple challenges to new students: managing college-level writing assignments, negotiating relationships with peers and professors, and successfully employing the peer-review model to improve student writing.  Through exposure to various theater play-tools, first-year composition students participate in collaborative and integrative exercises that strengthen their peer environment and their ability to constructively critique one another. In this presentation, I will offer a sampling of some of my most successful play-tools for developing strong first-year peer environments and discuss how these tools translate into productive peer-review sessions.

Speaker(s):
Columbus State University
Room: Atrium
Session Format: Poster

Cultural Quotient (CQ) is defined as the ability to function well in culturally diverse situations and has been used by these authors as a tool to evaluate the effectiveness of study abroad programs.  In a study of students who completed a short-term study abroad course that included visits to organizations in Belgium, France, and Switzerland, it was found that there was a significant increase in the CQ of the respondents.  Interestingly, in gathering demographic data from the students, it was noted that many respondents who were US citizens used terms such as Colombian-American, Hispanic, or Asian-American, rather than American, when responding to a question asking for their nationality.  The purpose of this study was to determine whether there was a statistically significant difference in the effects of study abroad on CQ between US students who ethnically identify and US students who do not.

Speaker(s):
Georgia Gwinnett College
Georgia Gwinnett College
Georgia Gwinnett College
Room: Atrium
Session Format: Poster

Public health education is increasingly focusing on collaborative work and building students’ skills for working in teams. Team-based Learning (TBL) is an active learning format that has the potential to help prepare students to work in interdisciplinary teams. Drawing upon mixed-methods evaluations of a Research Methods course, we describe how TBL facilitates students’ development of interpersonal skills and supports their learning of the content. Key themes include the development of team processes (e.g. communications strategies, division of work, decision-making), ways in which the team-based approach facilitated learning (e.g. accountability and preparation), and translation of team skills to other classes.

Speaker(s):
Rollins School of Public Health
Emory University
Room: Atrium
Session Format: Poster

The purpose of this study is to enhance students' learning and academic integrity in data analyses projects. In conventional intermediate accounting classes, students are assigned a data analysis project to work on Microsoft Excel spreadsheets. Each student’s assignment requires the same kind of analysis but includes a different data set initiated by hidden macro commands. The pilot study shows that students in a control group (with same data for all students) submit more accurate answers. However, students in the test group (with different data among students) have received higher scores in the separate post-project assessment, with higher satisfaction on the project.
 

Speaker(s):
Georgia Gwinnett College
Room: Atrium
Session Format: Poster

Mobile computing technology has been accelerating in recent years. AR technology on mobile devices has been used in advertising, games, entertainment, education, arts, etc. In my class, art students learn and develop software skills because software has become an essential art creating tool. They show moving images, video, sounds, 2dimensional art work and 3dimensional objects on various social websites. AR enables artists to engage more dynamically from interactive prints to their social network and websites. Artists are able to exhibit their multimedia artwork and their information using AR technology. The goal of the project is to create the exciting and experimental art work with AR technology. In the beginning, student learn what the AR technology is. Then, they come up with creative ideas to show their artwork/stories and to connect to the social network users for effective engagement using AR technology. Afterwards, they create innovative assets for the interactive postcard. At the end, artists deliver the interactive postcards that are engaging and dynamic.

Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Atrium
Session Format: Poster

This presentation highlights the networks we established among teachers and leaders in a Navajo community. These networks, which aligned with the theoretical perspectives of Vygotsky, Piaget, and Gee, promoted exploration of literature and culture heritage while enhancing student achievement in a Navajo community school. We used collaborative learning to encourage Navajo students to explore literacy in a cultural context. Teachers in a Navajo school used texts by Navajo and other Indigenous authors to provide opportunities for students to explore authentic literature. This presentation highlights the results of their authentic discussions of literature and collaborative strategies for enjoyment of reading. 

Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Atrium
Session Format: Poster

Anthropologists, psychologists and historians believe that storytelling has been with us since the beginning of our existence - in fact, they argue that storytelling defines our humanity. There is a universality in storytelling in that it continues to be used as a form of human expression in virtually all parts of the world. Integrating storytelling techniques in the classroom can help inspire, engage, and motivate. When we share stories we create a community of listeners bound by a common experience. What separates us tends to fade away. We discover we are all connected at the heart of the human experience.

Speaker(s):
Georgia Gwinnett College
Room: Atrium
Session Format: Poster

This poster will depict examples that presenters will explain regarding how various study tools and methods can be applied cross-disciplarily to support learning. These technigues have been used to increase grade in the course while reducing DFW. Data tables will be presented to demonstrate the viability of the tools and delivery method.

Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Kennesaw State University
Kennesaw State University
Room: Atrium
Session Format: Poster

Does note taking trigger a process that mentally encodes, and fosters, deeper understanding of information received?  The literature of pedagogical research contains some evidence that the process of notetaking triggers a formative development of understanding.  The hypothesized pathway for this trigger is that during the process of taking notes the receiver is forced to contemplate the value of the content they receive and which parts of the content to record.  This paper tests for evidence of an encoding effect in groups of students who were offered an inducement to take notes on course content in college level macroeconomics courses. 

Speaker(s):
Georgia Gwinnett College
Georgia Gwinnett College
Georgia Gwinnett College
Room: Atrium
Session Format: Poster

This poster session presents the results of a Teaching as Research project conducted in a Preparing Future Faculty course during the 2016-17 academic year.  In past iterations of the course, Graduate Teaching Assistants were primarily responsible for attending classes and keeping records.  In the 2016-17 iteration, the GTA developed and presented short workshops, actively engaged with student groups, and served as a peer educator and resource.  Utilizing an end-of-course survey, this Teaching as Research project explores the impact of the GTA’s revamped role on student learning outcomes in the course. 

Speaker(s):
Auburn University
Room: Atrium
Session Format: Poster

Studying neuroscience is critical for a well-rounded education in the social sciences. However, teaching neuroscience can be challenging when there is limited access to tools for students to monitor real-time brain activity. To address this problem, I developed an undergraduate laboratory exercise that challenged students to use observational measurements of a visual illusion to study neural activity. Students conducted simple psychophysical experiments to measure thresholds for detecting illusory spots under various conditions and described their results in a laboratory report. Assessment of students’ confidence and practical understanding of neural processing, before and after engagement with the laboratory exercise, was used to improve curriculum and instruction.

Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Atrium
Session Format: Poster

Many school districts are subscribing to Google for teacher and student accounts and there is an increasing need for Google certified educators specifically in education. This workshop introduces teachers to Google for Educators and the ease of being certified as Google Educators in Levels I, II, Certified Trainers, or Certified Innovators. The strategies assist in increasing collaboration and student achievement. Teachers will be able to simplify and save time through Google Classroom, Gmail, Docs, and more. Teachers can create assignments paperlessly and stay organized. There is free online training.

Speaker(s):
Campbell University
Room: Atrium
Session Format: Poster

Students and faculty often spend many hours sitting while studying and working at the computer to complete academic tasks. However, many hours spent sitting is associated with negative health consequences including type 2-diabetes, heart disease, cancer, and back pain. Moving more throughout the day has been shown to have positive health outcomes and improve productivity. This presentation will demonstrate how to implement the 20-8-2 rule to move more throughout the work day. Participants will collaborate to identify strategies to modify their work habits to promote standing and moving without sacrificing productivity.

Speaker(s):
Georgia State University Perimeter College
Room: Atrium
Session Format: Poster

Accredited environmental engineering decrees require graduates to be able to apply their knowledge of the sciences to concepts of professional practice and design. This transferable skill of relating what you learn in one setting to another situation is vital for the engineering profession. A course project of designing a professional poster was implemented to enhance student mastery in Environmental Engineering Microbiology while also developing transferable skills. Students completed anonymous surveys using Likert scale questions and qualitative measures to examining the extent to which the course project helped broaden student understanding.

Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Atrium
Session Format: Poster

Specifications grading promises to increase course rigor, to lower the grading burden on faculty and to increase student motivation. Here, I share the findings of a 2-year study where I examined the implementation of specifications grading in a flipped undergraduate statistics course for science majors. Student goal orientation was assessed before and after the course. The use of spec grading in the flipped classroom helped me cover more material at a greater depth and survey data indicate that those students who successfully achieved more bundles and higher hurdles in class, also tended to shift towards the mastery goal orientation.

Speaker(s):
University of Charleston, West Virginia
Room: Atrium
Session Format: Poster

This section focuses on electronic portfolio for purposeful and progressive assessment of learning Chinese as a foreign language. Through an ePortfolio in the form of creating a Chinese blog, students collect their work to showcase what they have learned and what they can do in the target language. Students demonstrate their ability to linguistically and culturally communicate through text, multimedia and graphic posted on their blogs. The process of producing a blog is purposefully connected to the progressive development of their language learning potentials. An ePortfolio can be adequately used as a tool to archive and assess student learning outcomes.

Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Atrium
Session Format: Poster

The only way to learn chemistry is working problems; student frustration and difficulty with chemical math often leads to withdrawal or work stoppage. To combat this, videotaping both simple and complex problems as well as using Airsketch, which allows problems worked in class to be captured and disseminated, has led to lowering student frustration level. These allow a more personalized set of notes for each class which can be posted for student consumption. Feedback from the students, both empirically and anecdotally, shows these techniques to be appreciated and supported by the students and myself.

 

Speaker(s):
Middle Georgia State University
Room: Atrium
Session Format: Poster

Coaching in the Classroom teaches the tools & methods used by Master Coaches for student success. In this session you'll learn how to incorporate master coaching techniques within your existing classroom instruction. Effective coaching brings academic content to life by connecting to each student’s learning goals. Coaching in the classroom trains educators on methods to increase student engagement and performance with various coaching methodologies. Some of the methods presented include: • Hot Seat: Group Coaching Process • NarrativeCoaching • GROW coaching model • and more..

Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: Atrium
Session Format: Poster

Essential skills employers want from students include communication, critical thinking, collaboration, self-management, professionalism, technological skill and ethical skills.  Graduating seniors (n = 31) were surveyed regarding their views on experiences (e.g., course work in the major) that fostered the development of those skills. There were significant differences in ratings of helpfulness among the types of experiences for all skills, except for critical thinking and technological skills.  Identifying where students find value in their college experience and exploring the connections various common experiences across the university is an important step toward best preparing students for future challenges.

Speaker(s):
Rockhurst University
Room: Atrium
Session Format: Poster

In August 2010, President Obama addressed the graduating class at Texas University and said, “In a single generation, we’ve fallen from 1st place to 12th place in college graduation rates for young adults” (CNN Wire Staff, 2010). Prior to- and since then, higher education research continues to emphasize student connection, critical thinking, and metacognition, as ways to help students engage in the learning process. In this regard, one technique to encourage student learning and empowerment is student-written reflective exams.

Speaker(s):
Georgia Military College - Augusta