Schedule

9:00am to 9:50am

Room: 460
Session Format: Presentation

This workshop applies concepts from Brookfield's (2017) book, Becoming a Critically Reflective Teacher. The proposed session will begin with an overview of the workshop, followed by the administration of the Critical Incident Questionnaire (CIQ) and discussion of the four lenses of critical reflection - students' eyes, colleagues' perceptions, theory, and personal experience. The attendees will then be guided through a reflection exercise by facilitators using one of the aforementioned lenses. The session will conclude with a debriefing of the small group discussions and closing comments by the organizers on how these concepts can enhance teaching and learning.

Speaker(s):
Georgia Gwinnett College
Georgia Gwinnett College
Georgia Gwinnett College
Georgia Gwinnett College
Room: 462
Session Format: Presentation

Transference between theoretical concepts and application is a significant goal for instructors in all disciplines. In this session, I will discuss how I used backward design and WHERE (Where/Why, Hook, Explore/Experience, Revise/Refine, Evaluate) sequencing (Wiggins & McTighe, 1998) in my studio art courses to help students transfer traditional analogue techniques and processes to digital processes such as 3D printing and software programs. I will provide opportunities for instructors in other disciplines to evaluate ways they can be apply these principles in their courses.

Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University

10:00am to 10:50am

Room: 174
Session Format: Presentation

I teach School Law (Cases/Ethics) for Piedmont College. My presentation will explain the importance of proper social media usage, current events regarding teachers in the news who are in trouble with social media and court cases still pending.

Speaker(s):
Piedmont College
Room: 460
Session Format: Presentation

Open Education Resources (OERs) are free education materials that can be used in classrooms by instructors and students. There are cost-specific benefits to using these resources in the classroom, since they eliminate high textbook costs. Workshop attendees will learn the various steps needed to successfully design and implement an OER course. These steps include writing learning objectives, creating formative and summative assessments, and aligning assessments with the learning objectives. The interactive workshop will model active learning strategies to encourage in-class discussion, student self-reflection, and the practice of writing learning objectives and assessment questions.

Speaker(s):
Georgia Institute of Technology
Georgia Tech
Room: 464
Session Format: Presentation

In college and universities, what happens during our class meetings (face-to-face or on-line) are major educational activities for our students; hence, creating a positive and inclusive environment in our courses is vital for learning and living in a diverse society.  As professors, no matter what subject we teach, we can broaden our approach so that all of our diverse students are included in a positive way.  Additionally, we can be conscientious of ways to ease culture tensions that might arise and have ways to support minority students’ educational process.  This interactive session will explore several methods we can implement.

Speaker(s):
California State University, Chico

11:00am to 12:00pm

Room: 400
Session Format: Presentation

Colleges and universities generally require that you submit letter grades to represent student performance, but how you determine those grades is up to you. Unfortunately, the way we have been grading student work for many decades earns low marks on a list of 14 criteria for assessing grading systems. This keynote presents an alternative system, specifications ("specs") grading, that does better, especially in motivating students to achieve outcomes and produce high-quality work.  Better yet, it saves you time. The system works effectively because it gives students more choices and control while holding their work to high academic standards. The purest form of this new system offers a new gestalt on assessment, combining three elements: satisfactory/unsatisfactory grading of all assignments and tests, a token system that lets students "buy" flexibility, and "bundles" of assessments associated with sets of learning outcomes and final letter grades. By the end of this keynote, you will be able adapt one or more of your courses to a pure or synthetic version of specs grading and revise your syllabus accordingly.

Speaker(s):
Clemson University

1:00pm to 1:50pm

Room: 460
Session Format: Presentation

Gathering student input through a survey method to gauge interest is sometimes actively needed to help confirm that a newly proposed course would be viable in a given program and situation on campus. In such cases, how should a faculty member effectively gather such input when students have very little frame of reference for the course or its contents? After addressing practical tips that I have used for promoting (and explaining) a potential new course and also a new program in my area, attendees will apply those tools to a scenario for promoting a new course/program of their own to enhance an existing program or major at their respective institution.

Speaker(s):
Atlanta Metropolitan State College
Room: 462
Session Format: Presentation

In this session, attendees will learn how to implement the use of Google Classrooms and digital notebooks. Research shows that going digital enhances student engagement and performance. Digital notebooks help students to personalize and individualize learning along with increasing collaboration with teachers and peers. Students may express their thinking through videos, apps, text, and pictures. Digital notebooks enables teachers to create learning templates to drive instruction and students are able to layer information on top of each other. In addition, students are able to hyperlink to third party apps. After the session, attendees will have all the tools they need to implement digital notebooks with confidence and ease.

Speaker(s):
Fayetteville State University
Room: 464
Session Format: Presentation

This Presentation will give an overview of POGIL (Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning) and Specifications Grading.  Their goals are to reduce the DWF rate, improve student learning outcomes and increase rigor.  Attendees will be introduced to POGIL with a hands-on activity and learn the importance of matching learning outcomes to specific assessments.

Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University

2:00pm to 2:50pm

Room: 174
Session Format: Presentation

Institutions of higher education (IHE) have incorporated high-impact practices in liberal arts curricula so that students can systematically analyze the conditions that lead to racial and economic disparities in the community. High impact practices assist students achieve these learning goals through a broad range of courses and strategies from service-learning and first-year experiences to diversity learning and experiential learning (i.e., internships) (Kuh & O'Donnell, 2013). This study compares student learning outcomes for 1,500 students enrolled in general education courses that utilize service-learning, diversity learning, and experiential learning as primary pedagogical methods. Strategies that contributed to problem-solving, cultural competence, leadership skills, and civic responsibility outcomes in undergraduates are discussed.

Speaker(s):
Widener Unviersity
Room: 460
Session Format: Presentation

As the baby boomers near their mid-60s, many are rethinking leaving their chosen career in teaching for retirement. Furthermore if all of those who are eligible to retire do follow through, the teaching profession will be impacted severely. This presentation will focus upon how seasoned and experienced professionals can be reinvigorated so that learners can experience their mature wisdom and mindfulness. Discussions will include basic approaches that can enable advanced career professionals to embrace the concept of mindfulness and to function at their most effective level. The value of experience and wisdom cannot be underestimated or overlooked.

Speaker(s):
University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Room: 462
Session Format: Presentation

This presentation will introduce the audience to Results Based Accountability (RBA), an action oriented performance management research tool that helps people develop a "disciplined way of thinking and taking action." This presentation will teach participates how to use Results Based Accountability and develop powerful strategies that can be used to bring about change in the classroom, with children and families and within the larger community.  Lastly, the presenters will use interactive activities such as ”turn the curve" thinking to demonstrate how RBA can help identify "the story behind the data" and strategize ways to improve conditions in the participants specific areas of interest.

Speaker(s):
Bethune Cookman University
Room: 464
Session Format: Presentation

The presenters will focus on the incorporation of semi-structured written reflections into undergraduate coursework to improve students' understanding and retention of important information and their ability to draw important connections to prior learning.

Speaker(s):
Honors College, Kennesaw State University

3:00pm to 3:50pm

Room: 174
Session Format: Presentation

Professionals from a variety of fields learn through written and video-based cases, role play, rehearsal, and various forms of simulated learning environments. While the case method has many forms, each has particular affordances and limitations. Professional educators often choose which method to use based on practical considerations, but should there be greater concern for pedagogical fit? In this session, we will consider various frequently-used forms of the case method and explore which approaches best meet particular learning outcomes. Together, we will also consider what case-based options exist in our professional fields and look for how these might successfully transfer.

Speaker(s):
Vanderbilt University's Peabody College
Room: 460
Session Format: Presentation

Student demonstration of historical empathy involves 1) identifying the historical context of sources, 2) examining documents for the perspectives of historical figures, and 3) making affective connections to content. Using documents from the instructional unit "The Elizabeth Jennings Project," which is about antebellum civil rights activist Elizabeth Jennings, this session focuses on strategies that can promote historical empathy as a high impact practice in undergraduate history, humanities, and social science courses.

Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: 462
Session Format: Presentation

Often the only instructional feedback faculty receive occurs at the end of the semester and focuses less on effective teaching and student learning and more on course logistics or instructor behavior. We ran 85 GIFT (Group Instructional Feedback Technique) sessions with 3116 students in order to provide mid-semester feedback. GIFT sessions focus student learning via class discussions without the instructor present. Instructors receive a written report synthesizing the student responses. We will review the GIFT results, compare these to end-of-semester evaluations, and simulate a GIFT session in order to explore how to provide useful instructional feedback focused on student learning.

Speaker(s):
Georgia State University
Room: 464
Session Format: Presentation

Research typically indicates that allowing students to correct tests in any subject is beneficial for the students as well as the teacher.  Students have an opportunity to reach higher levels of mastery, while teachers are able to provide more effective feedback; or at least those are the perceived notions!  The benefits of test corrections must outweigh the time energy for both the students and the teacher in the team effort to achieve higher levels of mastery learning.  This presentation focuses on the different types of test corrections across disciplines, ways to mitigate time despair for the teacher and lessons learned.

Speaker(s):
Georgia Gwinnett College

4:00pm to 4:50pm

Room: 400
Session Format: Poster

The only way to learn chemistry is working problems; student frustration and difficulty with chemical math often leads to withdrawal or work stoppage. To combat this, videotaping both simple and complex problems as well as using Airsketch, which allows problems worked in class to be captured and disseminated, has led to lowering student frustration level. These allow a more personalized set of notes for each class which can be posted for student consumption. Feedback from the students, both empirically and anecdotally, shows these techniques to be appreciated and supported by the students and myself.

 

Speaker(s):
Middle Georgia State University
Room: 400
Session Format: Poster

This presentation highlights the networks we established among teachers and leaders in a Navajo community. These networks, which aligned with the theoretical perspectives of Vygotsky, Piaget, and Gee, promoted exploration of literature and culture heritage while enhancing student achievement in a Navajo community school. We used collaborative learning to encourage Navajo students to explore literacy in a cultural context. Teachers in a Navajo school used texts by Navajo and other Indigenous authors to provide opportunities for students to explore authentic literature. This presentation highlights the results of their authentic discussions of literature and collaborative strategies for enjoyment of reading. 

Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University
Room: 400
Session Format: Poster

Like many institutions, Georgia State University utilizes Part-Time Instructors (PTIs) or adjunct faculty. In Fall 2016, Georgia State offered its first Part-Time Instructor Orientation, aimed at preparing PTIs to incorporate active learning techniques. We will discuss findings on the impact of our PTI orientation, especially in the areas of active learning and assessment. The presenter will provide examples and data from the orientation and conclude by working with attendees to help them develop their own active-learning PTI orientations and/or workshops and resources.

Speaker(s):
Georgia State University-Perimeter College
Room: 400
Session Format: Poster

Anthropologists, psychologists and historians believe that storytelling has been with us since the beginning of our existence - in fact, they argue that storytelling defines our humanity. There is a universality in storytelling in that it continues to be used as a form of human expression in virtually all parts of the world. Integrating storytelling techniques in the classroom can help inspire, engage, and motivate. When we share stories we create a community of listeners bound by a common experience. What separates us tends to fade away. We discover we are all connected at the heart of the human experience.

Speaker(s):
Georgia Gwinnett College
Room: 400
Session Format: Poster

The purpose of this study is to enhance students' learning and academic integrity in data analyses projects. In conventional intermediate accounting classes, students are assigned a data analysis project to work on Microsoft Excel spreadsheets. Each student’s assignment requires the same kind of analysis but includes a different data set initiated by hidden macro commands. The pilot study shows that students in a control group (with same data for all students) submit more accurate answers. However, students in the test group (with different data among students) have received higher scores in the separate post-project assessment, with higher satisfaction on the project.
 

Speaker(s):
Georgia Gwinnett College
Room: 400
Session Format: Poster

Historically, chemistry courses are "gateways" that sometimes deter students from entering STEM fields due to low perseverance. A General Chemistry 1 and two Organic Chemistry 1 classes implemented a "Specifications Grading" assessment plan where students controlled their own grades through choice of assessments that demonstrated mastery of course objectives. A phenomenological study of student errors over time was conducted. Motivation and perseverance in chemistry were compared with students in traditional exams-based chemistry courses. These results will be discussed, along with the development of the specifications grading assessment plan and how academic rigor was achieved in these chemistry courses.

Speaker(s):
Georgia Gwinnett College
Room: 400
Session Format: Poster

Does note taking trigger a process that mentally encodes, and fosters, deeper understanding of information received?  The literature of pedagogical research contains some evidence that the process of notetaking triggers a formative development of understanding.  The hypothesized pathway for this trigger is that during the process of taking notes the receiver is forced to contemplate the value of the content they receive and which parts of the content to record.  This paper tests for evidence of an encoding effect in groups of students who were offered an inducement to take notes on course content in college level macroeconomics courses. 

Speaker(s):
Georgia Gwinnett College
Room: 400
Session Format: Poster

Many school districts are subscribing to Google for teacher and student accounts and there is an increasing need for Google certified educators specifically in education. This workshop introduces teachers to Google for Educators and the ease of being certified as Google Educators in Levels I, II, Certified Trainers, or Certified Innovators. The strategies assist in increasing collaboration and student achievement. Teachers will be able to simplify and save time through Google Classroom, Gmail, Docs, and more. Teachers can create assignments paperlessly and stay organized. There is free online training.

Speaker(s):
Campbell University
Room: 400
Session Format: Poster

Accredited environmental engineering decrees require graduates to be able to apply their knowledge of the sciences to concepts of professional practice and design. This transferable skill of relating what you learn in one setting to another situation is vital for the engineering profession. A course project of designing a professional poster was implemented to enhance student mastery in Environmental Engineering Microbiology while also developing transferable skills. Students completed anonymous surveys using Likert scale questions and qualitative measures to examining the extent to which the course project helped broaden student understanding.

Speaker(s):
Kennesaw State University